Amazing Stories

February 13, 2014

Amazing Stories Amazing Stories was a television anthology series developed by Steven Spielberg that featured tales of fantasy, science fiction, and horror and ran from 1985 – 1987.  It was graced by some pretty well-known writers, such as Richard Matheson (I am Legend, A Stir of Echoes); a host of even better-known directors, such as Spielberg himself, Clint Eastwood, Martin Scorcese, and Robert Zemeckis; and a gaggle of famous 80s actors, like John Lithgow, Charlie Sheen, Kevin Costner, Gregory Hines, James Cromwell, Mark Hamill, Jeffrey Jones, Jon Cryer, Christina Applegate, Christopher Lloyd, that guy who played the jerk Troy in The Goonies…the list goes on.

I remember watching these episodes as a young kid, and some of them stuck with me over the years, particularly “No Day at the Beach,” a rather dark study of heroism set during the invasion of Normandy and featuring a then-likeable Sheen.  I was extremely pleased to see that both seasons of the show have been made available on Netflix streaming.  Now my treadmill runs in this cold winter weather will seem to go just a little faster with the warm glow of 80s nostalgia working its magic.


Book Review: The Scroll of Years by Chris Willrich

October 20, 2013

Book cover: The Scroll of Years, by Chris Willrich

I’ve been reading Chris Willrich’s short fiction for years, and I particularly enjoy his Gaunt and Bone stories. Their lyricism and whimsy seem to fill a void in a fantasy fiction landscape marked by dark, gritty realism. I love dark, gritty realism, but I can only take so much.

I’ve long been hoping that some gutsy publisher would buck the trend and print a compilation of Willrich’s Gaunt and Bone tales to sprinkle some dreamlike fable amidst our worldly fantasy fiction. Instead, this Gaunt and Bone novel arrives.  Even better.  The fantasy fiction shelves need to be stocked with more books like this one.

Willrich injects The Scroll of Years with the same gorgeous prose of his short fiction but still manages to move the story along at a steady clip. It rises to a pulse-pounding pace in delightfully entertaining moments of action and at times slows to a trickle to allow the reader to ponder a bit of philosophy. But it never stalls.  The landscape—described in precise, exquisite detail—is a character in itself (literally and figuratively), and the dialogue is witty and insightful. Through all of this, Willrich weaves his signature threads of antithesis and paradox. There’s enough depth and beauty here to make subsequent readings just as entertaining as the first.

Book Cover The Silk Map by Chris Willrich

He packs this all into about 260 pages, which is impressive, but this may have detracted from the overall story a bit only because it prevents the inclusion of more background about the characters. Gaunt and Bone, and some of the secondary characters as well, have fascinating pasts that readers can only glimpse. This is at once tantalizing and frustrating. Readers well acquainted with Gaunt and Bone will not be deterred, but those meeting the characters for the first time may miss out a little on what makes them so compelling.

I do hope this absence will urge them to read the next installment, The Silk Map, to learn more. I’ve already pre-ordered my copy (and I’m still holding out hope for that Gaunt and Bone short story compilation).


Author Page at Amazon.com

August 14, 2013

Looks like I have an official Author Page up and running at Amazon.com: amazon.com/author/hawkins

Another cool thing I discovered the other day is that a couple of my stories made it into the Internet Speculative Fiction Database.

So I’ve got that going for me, which is nice.


Facelift for Return of the Sword

August 10, 2013

It appears that Return of the Sword, a Rogue Blades anthology one of my stories was published in a while back, has an all-new look. The revamped cover, still featuring artwork by Johnney Perkins, looks great. I’m guessing it’s still selling well.

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Gaunt and Bone Novel Arrives in September

May 9, 2013

Book cover: The Scroll of Years, by Chris Willrich

This is news I have been waiting a long time to hear. Chris Willrich has taken his characters Persimmon Gaunt and Imago Bone on an adventure beyond the short form, where they’ve been entertaining readers since 2002, and into the uncharted territory of a novel entitled The Scroll of Years, to be published by Pyr in September.

This is sure to be superb. Willrich writes some of the most beautiful prose I’ve seen in the fantasy genre, and his characters are unique and compelling.


An RotS Review I Missed

June 6, 2011

I just discovered today another review of Return of the Sword that fell completely under my radar.  Argentinian author Gustavo Bondoni penned his positive impressions of the anthology back in October of 2009 for SFReader.com.  Bondoni writes:

“The stories strike a balance between entertainment and character development that is satisfying from both a literary and an adventure point of view.”

That’s not always an easy balance to strike. And I was very happy to see he enjoyed my own contribution to the anthology.

“A couple of stories stood out for me – ‘What Heroes Leave Behind’ by Nicholas Ian Hawkins is a somewhat poignant story of an aging warrior who, nevertheless, accepts his duty and ‘The Red Worm’s Way’ by James Enge, a convoluted tale in which nothing, and no one is what they seem.”

It’s always nice when someone says your story stands out, but this praise is particularly pleasing because Bondoni is a rather prolific author, and the other tale he mentions is written by a World Fantasy Award nominee.

This reminds me I need to start writing again one of these days soon.


Summer Day, Touch of Autumn

September 7, 2009

Summer doesn’t seem to be dying gently, but I can feel that fall will soon be here. I see that the high school football season has begun, which always brings to mind this poem:

Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio
By James Wright

In the Shreve High football stadium,
I think of Polacks nursing long beers in Tiltonsville,
And gray faces of Negroes in the blast furnace at Benwood,
And the ruptured night watchman of Wheeling Steel,
Dreaming of heroes.

All the proud fathers are ashamed to go home.
Their women cluck like starved pullets,
Dying for love.

Therefore,
Their sons grow suicidally beautiful
At the beginning of October,
And gallop terribly against each other’s bodies.

I also recall the bittersweet returns to the library after the long summers of my college days: eager to learn, reluctant to give up lazy days. I do think of those early days of fall semesters with a fondness that this quotation by Alcuin (from right around the end of the 8th century) captures beautifully:

“O how sweet life was when we used to sit at leisure amid the book boxes of a learned man, piles of books, and the venerable thoughts of the Fathers; nothing was missing that was needed for…the pursuit of knowledge.”

Autumn has always been a creatively inspiring time for me, and I hope the tradition continues this year.

In the Shreve High football stadium,
I think of Polacks nursing long beers in Tiltonsville,
And gray faces of Negroes in the blast furnace at Benwood,
And the ruptured night watchman of Wheeling Steel,
Dreaming of heroes.

All the proud fathers are ashamed to go home.
Their women cluck like starved pullets,
Dying for love.

Therefore,
Their sons grow suicidally beautiful
At the beginning of October,
And gallop terribly against each other's bodies.

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